Sunday, March 19, 2017

Session 2: Question 1 Six Building Blocks of Innovative Learning

Chapter 4: After reading this chapter, do you have ideas of how you could implement an innovation project?  Cite your page numbers.

10 comments:

  1. This chapter reminds me of when I toured Rice University Engineering Department last year. They had real world problems on several different tables. Students could choose the different problems that were presented on the tables. These problems reflected real people's needs. Students could form their own collaborative groups and prototype different solutions. For example, one problem reflected a quadriplegic 10 year old who wanted to swim independently in the pool. The criteria was the boy should be able to float on his own without assistance. There were several types of prototypes that were trying to be made and another group was still making ideas on how to solve the problem. This is parallals perfectly to when Mrs. Andi McNair mentioned that all students are brainstorming with the same idea in mind: passion (Kindle location 974). That is a difference between just making a project on an iPad about a historical figure and creating a project that has real world applications. Real life and passion.

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    1. I agree with you Annie. It actually reminds me of the Somalia project you did with the water jugs you had them carry across the field. Whenever you can personalize something for them and make it real to them it helps them learn and it's something they remember.

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    2. I agree with Annie Mitchell's response on June 14th that when you make it personalized and relevant for students, its just that much more meaningful to them.

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    3. This sounds like the program for kids called Odyssey of the Mind. Kids creatively solve real world problems. We should consider making it a part of our Power Hour program.

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  2. On page 53 I noted ideas for Elementary school children. One was introducing augmented reality to teachers. Students could introduce anything they are an expert on to someone else. The other was sharing why snakes are not all bad. This would be a good starting point for sharing why anything is not all bad or debunking myths as a public service.

    I am trying to come up with ways to involve innovative teaching within the curriculum, but I am still working on it.

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    1. I agree with Melanie on June 18 when she mentions the importance of coming up with ways to involve innovative teaching within the curriculum. I think we need to come up with innovative ways to help students learn the core subject material. FYI, I did not say teach, I said learn. I believe true innovation encourages and shows students how to teach themselves core concepts and real world problem-solving.

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  3. I love how they talk about being okay to fail on pages 48-49. It's a lot like SBISD's motto-it's okay to fail when you try new things. Students need to stop worrying about their grade so much and focus on what they are learning and getting out of their work. When kids know it's okay to fail, they are more willing to try new things and be okay with failing as well. I love the idea of a "fearless classroom" and kids being willing to take the risk and failing only to get back up and try again.

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  4. Some ideas that come to mind to implement an innovative project would be to create a blog site with students being the driven model. We would reach out to another class similar to ours in a different part of the world and see how they are learning math or science. Students would be able to interact in real life and "create something meaningful" page 50 to their learning.
    Also, during our unit study of mammals, we can actually brainstorm ideas and get an expert involved in learning more about mammals. We could Skype with experts and students could see that "teachers aren't the only expert or person with all the answers." Page 46.

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  5. P. 52 discusses some elements of an innovation program for elementary students such as brainstorming ideas, finding experts, etc. that are very useful. I think it is important that these elements be used to help students solve problems in their immediate environment. Students can brainstorm and develop innovative programs for morning announcements, morning/breakfast/lunch times, PBIS or behavior guidelines, fun school wide programs (including incentives). annual campus themes and slogans, annual campus t-shirts, a yearly campus charity, campus grants and write them, etc. Just like us, they respect things they have invested in.

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  6. Kindle location 934 says that offering the opportunity to work on relevant projects is another way to spark student engagement and retention of knowledge. During a math unit, students can research real world examples of how various people use that specific skill in their job. They can maybe find someone that's in that field to talk to about how they use it in their job.

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