Sunday, March 19, 2017

Session 3: Question 2 Opportunities Are Everywhere

Chapter 8: How do you seek out opportunities to get your students some out-of-the-ordinary experiences or encourage them to find those opportunities? Cite your page numbers. 

18 comments:

  1. I truly got teary-eyed when I read that story about how Don and his students gained opportunity after opportunity at the Super Bowl media day just on their desire to seek more opportunities (Kindle location 1815). I thought about Don's amazing "opportunities are everywhere" for his students and questioned if I am providing, or better yet, actively seeking opportunities for my students. So I googled #OAEproj and I found https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V8hLN5cMEpg . I also searched #OAEproj on Twitter and found great things that students are doing for others such as giving blankets to the local homeless and video conferences with students from Israel to discuss about the Palestine conflict. In the coming year, I am definitely going to actively seek opportunities for my students.

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    1. I like Annie's approach. As I read, I am brainstorming and researching opportunities and ideas too. A great place to go is kidworldcitizen.org. They have some great kid appropriate community service ideas.

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  2. @Annie 6/18/17 I was teary eyed, too, about the students achieving an interview and actually gaining entrance to continue media experience. I was very impressed with the student questions, and that the teacher knew the sports person from watching 60 Minutes, not a sports channel.

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  3. Obesity in Innovation, page 111, was a wonderful example of low levels of technology, but high levels of relationships. I will challenge myself and my students to find ways to make a difference in relationships. There are so many opportunities on campus. Some of the opportunities are quite unique to NHE.

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    1. @Melanie I loved how the relationships were what helped the young student. Don started with "when did you give up?" That simple concern opened the conversation and the doors to the problem solving. Amazing.

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    2. I agree with Melanie Marshall's response on June 21 regarding the low levels of technology but high levels of relationships, it's important to form meaningful friendship( page 113) and not just " friend" strangers on line. It's good to get supporter s to support you but having a physical body present is valuable too.

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    3. Jeanne BreidenthalJuly 7, 2017 at 10:08 AM

      I agree with Melanie. I absolutely could relate with this chapter. Mentoring other students is huge and when another student that's looked up to takes on that role it makes a huge impact. I loved how the group started as a struggling student and a mentor turned into something big and life changing.

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    4. I agree with Melanie on low levels of technology but high levels of relationships. Imagine the things we discover about one another when we do so and what can then be done together.

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  4. The story about he Super Bowl media really brought me to tears. I really find that story so touching and meaningful. I love how Don" always watching for opportunities my students." Page 109. I love that he's always wondering how this persons might be able to enchanted his student's career or learning experience. Page 109. I am in awe of his advice, " but you have to ask ...with passion and urgency." Page 103.
    Truthfully, I do not seek out ooptunities for students to connect with people. I only do so when I'm at school such as when we had career day and I asked the financial banker to come back for a study on banking and interest for our personal financial literacy unit.
    Now that seeking out and striking up a conversation is vital tool as educators. I'll be seeking that opportunity more so in the future.

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    1. Sarah Chu June 26, 2017

      I really liked this story as well! Not only was it really entertaining to read (especially the part about pulling the student card) but it really reinforces the idea and mindset that by being confident in our actions and daring to take risks one will be able to go further than one ever thought.

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  5. Jeanne BreidenthalJuly 7, 2017 at 10:18 AM

    I really liked the Untapped Resources on page 114-115. I really like how he encourages students to go out into the real world and outside the school walls. I also like how he said it was more empowering and life changing when we allow the students to find their own mentors and opportunities. I love how he says go out and relate to people, make connections and make a difference in the world.

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  6. Opportunities "are" everywhere p. 106. The author gave two relative examples, he talked about the ingenious way his students obtained Super Bowl media passes pp. 105-108 and "obesity in innovation" pp. 111-114 - how students helped others with personal, weight and health issues. To galvanize innovation, you just have to asked questions..What is going on at our school (Indoors and Outdoors)? How can we can help improve things? It's really a innovative approach to teaching social studies. I use federal, state and local government agencies for awesome opportunities. They will come out and tell you things that are going on the community that you would not believe, what they are doing to resolve problems...and ask for our help! Some years back, we were having plumbing problems at our school. We had a presenter from one of our local water treatment plants (the home of our tub/shower, toilet and drinking water) to visit us. You would not believe, the resulting discussions and the student initiated changes we made on our campus. Kids really like making a difference and they have advocates who will provide them with human, monetary and material resources.

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  7. I like how he said on kindle location 1895 that we can "easily find excellent projects and opportunities at school". It's a good reminder that we should always be on the look out, and that we're not just there to teach them the TEKS but also life experiences.

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    1. @Alice O'Meara. You are so right that we can find opportunities within our own school such as the Urban garden or reading with other struggling students.

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    2. I also agree with Alice O'Meara's comment on July 20th. We have so many opportunities to serve at our school, it's just a matter of finding the project and doing the work to serve. I think it'd be neat if each grade level had their own project for the school- or even each teacher!

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  8. I truly do believe in the statements, "Teachers know everybody.. We know someone or have a friend that knows someone." (pg. 105). On my Facebook account, I have a wide variety of friends. Some are teachers, but some are lawyers, doctors, engineers, real estate agents...etc. I know that if I were to reach out on Facebook looking for an opportunity for my students, that my friends may have many ideas in mind. I think it'd be neat to do a group project in my Kindergarten class, where we as a class chose one company/non-profit/organization to serve. I also think that on campus we have many opportunities to serve, too. I'm sure my Kindergartners would thrive off of the experience and truly be blessed.

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  10. I will admit, that aside from signing up for an educational set of Hot Wheels cars and tracks (I think I may still be on a wait list for) and housing mealworms, I wish I could have provided more out-of-the-ordinary experiences. However, the book has provided a great resource for seeking out these opportunities for students so that they make take their learning to the next level. (pg. 153)

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